Terminology

Contents


METHODOLOGY

The following describes the relevant terminology of SuperData’s unique methodology.

  • Process: SuperData bases all its estimates on line-item transaction, login, and acquisition data, which we collect every month across hundreds of digital games worldwide. We build algorithms of key metrics (e.g. monthly active users, conversion rate and average spending) around this primary data source and use secondary sources, such as publicly available information and regular survey studies, to fill in the gaps. We further update our data models in a continuous feedback loop with publishers and developers in our partner network.
  • SuperData Database: Our data partner network is our core strength. The backbone of all our research is an internally-built database containing the purchase information for hundreds of games. We’ve accomplished this by establishing strong, trust-based relationships with industry leading game developers, publishers, and payment service providers. To date, our database contains the game purchases of 160 million unique digital gamers worldwide, covering almost 500 game titles.
  • Public Information: Game publishers and developers occasionally release metrics via their website, investor relations reports, conferences, and public interviews. Public information is cross-referenced against industry-specific averages and internally calculated ranges to verify legitimacy and improve accuracy.
  • Life Cycle Model: To provide title-level estimates, we employ genre-based life cycle growth-decay models, allowing us to pinpoint a game title’s location in its life cycle. This provides for the most accurate readings possible of a game’s ability to improve metrics during its ascent and readjust strategy during decline.
  • Regional Seasonality Model: We incorporate genre-based regional seasonality factors to reflect seasonal expansion and contraction for each metric with respect to cultural events and holidays in each of the markets that we cover. We further fortify this model by performing regular localized survey studies.
  • Genre Reactivity Model: We describe the digital games market using detailed reactivity models based on genre and sub-genre information for all major countries. This allows us to predict metrics changes relative to key drivers such as platform penetration, internet accessibility or payment friction in particular markets before they happen.


PRODUCT TERMINOLOGY

  • Analyst Call: A 30 to 60 minute call between a client and an analyst centered around a specific research topic.
  • Analyst Hour: The basic unit of measurement for analyst effort, an analyst hour represents the quantity of work an analyst completes in one hour. Used to evaluate the scope and cost of custom projects and the extent of post-deliverable client support.
  • Standard Data Deliverable: A data set pulled directly from the Arcade or the Arena.
  • Custom Data Deliverable: A non-standard data set of performance metrics that measures client-defined titles and/or markets.
  • Custom Survey: A survey that collects consumer data to measure client-defined audiences.
  • Content Slide: The basic unit of measurement for the length of a research deck. A content slide features rich data visualizations, expert analysis and key insights.
  • Research Deck: A deck of content slides that summarizes the key findings of a research study.
  • Research Study: A combination of a custom survey, a custom data deliverable, a research deck and/or a client webinar/presentation.
  • Client Presentation: A 30 to 60 minute in-person session with a segment analyst who presents the findings of a research study with a presentation deck.
  • Client Review Call: A 30 to 60 minute phone call with a segment analyst to review research deliverables.
  • Client Webinar: A 30 to 60 minute private online session with a segment analyst who presents the findings of a research study.
  • Month: A standard length of measurement for standard and custom data deliverables. Any of the twelve parts, as January or February, into which the calendar year is divided.
  • Quarter: A standard length of measurement for market forecasts that divides a calendar year into four 3-month quarters that begin in January.
  • Presentation Slide: The basic unit of measurement for the length of a presentation deck. Presentation slides feature data-rich visualizations with few words.
  • Presentation Deck: A deck of presentation slides prepared for in-person presentations and public webinars. Not meant to be understood outside of the context provided by the presenter.
  • Public Webinar: A 30 to 60 minute online presentation that promotes SuperData’s products and research.
  • Syndicated Report: An off-the-shelf report delivered to subscribed SuperData clients and available for purchase on the SuperData website.
  • White paper: Shorter than a research deck, a white paper is a mostly text-based research report that provides analysis and guidance on a specific research topic.


CUSTOM DATA TERMINOLOGY

  • Ad Revenue: Defined as gross revenue generated by a game through the use of banner ads, video ads and game and app install referrals.
  • Average Revenue Per Paying User (ARPPU): The average revenue generated by a paying user within a particular month.
    • In-game ARPPU: Defined as the average revenue generated from any in-game purchases by a paying monthly active user in a given month.
    • Season Pass ARPPU (Season Pass Average Revenue Per Paying User): The average season pass revenue generated by a paying MAU/MUU where applicable, in a given month.
    • DLC ARPPU (DLC Revenue Average Revenue Per Paying User): The average DLC revenue generated by a paying MAU/MUU where applicable, in a given month.
    • Microtransaction ARPPU: Defined as the average microtransaction revenue generated by a paying monthly active user in a given month.
  • Average Revenue Per User (ARPU): The average revenue generated per user within a particular month.
  • Average Game Price: The average price for a digital copy of a particular title within a particular month.
  • Average Subscription Fee: Average subscription fee paid by a subscriber to access a particular title in a given month.
  • Conversion Rate: The percentage or rate of monthly active users who have shifted from non-paying to paying users.
    • In-game Conversion: Defined as the percentage of monthly active users who have made at least one in-game purchase in a given month.
    • Season Pass Conversion: Defined as the percentage of MAU/MUU where applicable, who have made at least one season pass purchase in a given month.
    • DLC Conversion: Defined as the percentage of MAU/MUU where applicable, who have made at least one DLC purchase in a given month.
    • Microtransaction Conversion: Defined as the percentage of monthly active users who have made at least one in-game microtransaction purchase in a given month.
  • Cost per Install (CPI): Describes the average monthly marketing spend per install of a game within on a specific platform or within a specific genre (e.g., mobile, social, etc.) CPI represents non-incentivized traffic and is measured among users who are acquired purely as a result of marketing and paid discovery efforts. It does not include installs from incentivized users who receive a monetary benefit for creating an account, downloading, or opening an application.
  • Daily Active Users (DAU): The number of unique users who have opened an application at least once over the course of a calendar day.
  • Downloads: The number of first-time installations of a game.
  • Download Rank: The rank of a title in a given app store based on monthly game downloads.
  • Full Game Sales: The number of digital copies of a particular title that were purchased in a given calendar month. Includes marked-up premium editions.
  • Game Subscription Service: A subscription that primarily provides access to multiple games for a recurring fee. Subscribers either get access to a library of games (e.g., PlayStation Now, Xbox Game Pass) or receive redeemable game keys each month (e.g., Humble Monthly).
  • Grossing Rank: The rank of a title in a given app store based on monthly revenue.
  • Hours Watched (GVC only): Defined as the total number of aggregate hours viewers have collectively watched gaming video content, regardless of video type and video source, unless otherwise specified.
  • Lifetime Value (LTV): Defined as (for all players): Average ARPU across the average gamer lifetime x Average gamer lifetime (in months); or (for paying players only): Average ARPPU across the average payer lifetime x Average payer lifetime (in months). The average revenue generated over the lifetime of a player in a single game.
  • Monthly Active Users (MAU): The number of users who log in and play a game at least once over the course of a month, including trial and free users. Users can be counted more than once within a particular game if they log in through multiple accounts, or within a particular genre/category if they log into multiple games.
  • Monthly Unique Users (MUU): The number of unique users who log in and play a game at least once over the course of a month, including trial and free users. Multiple account users and multiple game users are adjusted to prevent counting unique individuals more than once.
  • Retention: Percentage of MAU from the previous month who log in and play a game at least once over the course of the following month.
  • Reacquisition: Number of MAU who log in and play at least once in a given month who did not play in the previous month but have played at least once in the months prior.
  • Subscriber: An individual who makes regular recurring payments to access features in a game or online service. A person may have access to multiple subscriptions during the month.
  • Total Digital Revenue: Defined as the sum of all Full Game Revenue and In-game Revenue, each where applicable. Note: for Console and PC games, Additional Content Revenue includes all other forms of digital revenue aside from full game download revenue.
    • Full Game Revenue: Defined as Full Game Sales x Average Game Price. Revenue generated from the digital sale of a base game. (includes marked-up premium editions editions)
    • In-game Revenue: Defined as a sum of Season Pass Revenue, DLC Revenue, Microtransaction Revenue and Subscription Revenue, each where applicable. Revenue generated from any transaction that happens after purchase/download of the base game.
    • Season Pass Revenue: Revenue generated from the digital sale and digital delivery of a season pass. Defined as: MAU x Season Pass Conversion x Season Pass ARPPU.
    • DLC Revenue: Revenue generated from the digital sale and digital delivery of downloadable content (DLC). Defined as: MAU x DLC Conversion x DLC ARPPU.
    • Microtransaction Revenue: Defined as MAU x Microtransaction Conversion Rate x Microtransaction ARPPU. Revenue generated from in game microtransactions.
    • Subscription Revenue: Defined as Subscribers x Average Subscription Fee. Revenue generated from digital subscription fees.
  • Total Revenue (GVC Market): Defined as a sum of Ad Revenue, Donation Revenue, Subscription Revenue and Sponsorship Revenue.
    • Ad Revenue (GVC Market): Defined as the revenue generated by content creators as well as the media hosting website through gaming video content. This includes pay-per-click ads, as well as pay-per-view ads.
    • Donation Revenue (GVC Market): Defined as the revenue generated by the content creators through means of voluntary, monetary donations from their fans and viewers. Typically, these donations are made through third party applications such as Patreon and StreamLabs.
    • Subscription Revenue (GVC Market): Defined as the revenue generated from viewers subscribing to content creators’ video channels for a small monthly fee, the fee varying from platform to platform. Typically, both the content creator as well as the hosting platform take a percentage of the revenue.
    • Sponsorship Revenue (GVC Market): Defined as the revenue generated by various brands and companies sponsoring content creators as a form of advertising. The content creator will be paid a sum of money for using, wearing, or displaying a product, for example an energy drink or keyboard, in their videos.
  • Unique Viewership (GVC only): Defined as the number of unique viewers who have watched video content of the specified title on any platform (YouTube, Twitch, Douyu, etc.)


GLOSSARY

  • Android: Operating system developed by Google, Inc. for smartphone and tablet devices.
  • App Store: An online marketplace where users can purchase and download apps and games, such as the iOS App Store and Google Play.
  • Browser Games: Games that are not downloaded onto a computer but instead are played directly inside a web browser.
  • Casual Gamers: Gamers who play occasionally, choosing games that have a low learning curve and can be played easily whenever they have a free moment.
  • Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR): Defined as the nth root of the total percentage growth rate, where n is the number of years in the period being considered. It represents the year-over-year growth rate of a figure over a specified period of time, assuming it is growing at a steady rate.
  • Core or Mid-Core Gamers: Gamers who play a variety of games as often as they can, but may not always have the time or inclination to finish every game or commit to regular gameplay.
  • Console: A device that connects to a television in order to allow for video gameplay. Newer generations of consoles (2005 and after) allow for media consumption outside of video games such as downloaded and streaming television, movies and music. E.g., Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), Sega Genesis, PlayStation, Xbox 360, PS4, Wii U.
  • Digital Games: Games downloaded and played on a digitally-capable device such as a smartphone, tablet, PC/Mac, console or handheld gaming device. This does not include physical copies of games.
  • Digital Game Store or Digital Application Store: An online store where users can purchase and download games and in-game content onto a digitally-capable device. E.g., Steam, Epic Games Store, App Store, Google Play, PlayStation Store, Xbox Marketplace, Nintendo Online Store.
  • Downloadable Content (DLC): Refers to in-game content downloads. The two major channels of distribution are Console and PC. Defined as individual game mechanic-altering content: map packs, single player content, unlockable characters, permanent level boosts, digital deluxe upgrades etc.
  • Genre: A category of video games that is characterized by a particular core gameplay mechanic.
    • Action-Adventure: Games that combine elements of action gameplay (emphasizes physical challenges) and adventure gameplay (narrative-based). E.g., Assassin’s Creed, Tomb Raider, Uncharted.
    • Casino: Games that simulate casino gameplay.
      • Casino Style: Casino games that offer a virtual casino environment where a variety of gambling games are available including cards, slots and table games. E.g., DoubleDown Casino, Big Fish Casino.
      • Slots: Slot machine casino games where the outcome is based on chance. E.g., Slotomania.
      • Card Table Games: Various card-based casino games (such as Baccarat, Blackjack, Hi-Lo) in which players can place wager but are generally played on a smaller scale than Poker games. E.g., Bee Cave Blackjack & Slots.
      • Bingo: Bingo casino games with a random automated caller where the outcome is based on chance. E.g., Bingo Bash, Bingo Blitz.
      • Poker: Card based casino games, such as Texas Hold’em Poker, where the outcome is largely based on player skill.
    • Card Games: Games that have cards as their main gameplay item. Includes Collectible Card Games as the main subgenre.
      • Collectible Card Games: Games of strategy where players battle with their own deck of cards, sold in random assortments and/or traded amongst players, against other players and their decks. Gameplay is primarily determined by drawing and playing cards, though it may also include other mechanics. E.g. Puzzle and Dragons, Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft, Magic: The Gathering.
    • Fighting: Games where two or more characters fight each other during short rounds. E.g. Street Fighter, Super Smash Bros., Tekken.
    • Survival: Games where survival is the core element of the game. E.g. Rust, Ark: Survival Evolved, The Evil Within.
    • Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA): Similar to Strategy games, these are titles in which two teams focus on strategic planning to destroy each other’s bases. Players control a single character and fight in discrete battles along lanes but, unlike in Strategy games, they do not harvest or manage resources. E.g., League of Legends, Dota 2, SMITE.
    • Puzzle: Games that require the completion of puzzles to progress through gameplay. E.g., Candy Crush Saga, Cut the Rope, Where’s My Water?
    • Racing: Games that simulate races. E.g, Forza Motorsport, Gran Turismo, Mario Kart.
    • Role-Playing Game: Games where players take on the role and decision-making abilities of a character in order to advance through a fictional setting. E.g., Dragon Age, Final Fantasy VII, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim.
    • Shooter: Games centered on weapon combat from a first-person perspective. E.g., Battlefield, Call of Duty, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Fortnite.
    • Simulation: Games that simulate “real-life” skills and scenarios. E.g., The Sims, SimCity, Amateur Surgeon.
    • Sports: Games that simulate sports gameplay. E.g., FIFA, Madden NFL, NBA 2K.
    • Strategy: Games that focus on strategic planning with either real-time or turn-based gameplay. These games often involve resource creation and management. E.g., Civilization, Clash of Clans, StarCraft.
  • Feature Phone: Mobile phones that have more features than a standard call and text capable mobile but less features than a smartphone. Less expensive than smartphones but have limited third party application integration.
  • Free-to-Play/Freemium (F2P): Offering a game, product or service free of charge (such as software, web services or other) while charging a premium for advanced features, functionality, or related products like virtual goods and services.
  • Full Game: A base game that is purchased and/or installed, not including any in-game items that are purchasable and/or downloadable after the initial installation. Includes marked-up premium editions editions.
  • Hardcore Gamers: Avid gamers who generally spend most of their free time playing video games, have the latest gaming technology and play a few chosen games on a regular basis or to completion.
  • Handheld Gaming Device/Console: A dedicated handheld gaming device that is portable and has a built-in screen, controller and audio output. E.g., GameBoy, PlayStation Portable, Nintendo 3DS, NVIDIA SHIELD portable.
  • In-App Purchase (IAP): The purchase of virtual goods within a mobile gaming application after its initial installation.
  • In-game Content: Any content that is available after installation of the base game. Includes Season Passes, DLC, Microtransactions and Subscriptions.
  • Intellectual Property (IP): Original and proprietary creative material used in a game, such as storyline, animation, characters, gaming mechanics, etc.
  • iOS: Operating system developed by Apple for iPhones, iPods and iPads.
  • Key Performance Indicators (KPI): Metrics used to measure the performance of a game, including revenue, monthly active users, average revenue per paying user (ARPPU) and conversion rate.
  • Market: A geography-, platform- or segment- based area of demand for video games, e.g. North American Premium Console market.
  • Microtransactions: In-game purchases of downloadable content, such as in-game currency, vanity items, weapons, songs, vehicles, loot crates, temporary items, EXP boosts etc.
  • MMO/MMOG: Massively Multiplayer Online games that can involve both persistent and/or instance-based worlds in which users can interact in real-time with one another within a simulated environment. These games often include an independent virtual economy and employ free-to-play monetization mechanics, subscriptions/premium accounts or a hybrid of both.
  • Pay-to-Play (P2P): Requiring a purchase or subscription in order to gain full access to a game, product or service, while sometimes also charging a premium for virtual goods or additional content.
  • PC/Mac: A desktop or laptop computer with the capabilities to install and run video games.
  • Platform: A combination of hardware (console, PC, mobile) and software that creates an ecosystem for the user and provides access to play a certain game category. E.g., Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, Steam, Android.
  • Smartphone: Mobile phones with computer-enabled features such as data storage, high-speed Internet access, media playback and email capabilities. Support third party application integration. E.g., iPhone, Samsung Galaxy, HTC, Nokia Lumia, Amazon Fire Phone.
  • Segment: A segment is defined as a combination of a platform and a particular monetization scheme that is universal for all games in the same segment. Currently SuperData offers insights into the following nine (9) segments: Free-to-play PC, Free-to-play Console, Premium PC, Premium Console, Pay-to-play PC, Mobile, Social, XR, GVC/esports.
    • Free-to-play (F2P) PC: Massively Multiplayer Online games that earn revenue according to a free-to-play model. Revenue is earned from expansion packs and microtransaction-based virtual items and services.
      • Free-to-play hybrid game: A game where subscriptions enhance the game experience with benefits such as bonus experience and extra inventory slots, but all gameplay content can be accessed for free.
    • Free-to-Play Console: Console games that earn revenue according to the free-to-play model. Revenue is earned from expansion packs and microtransaction-based virtual items and services.
    • Premium PC: PC games that earn revenue from purely digital products such as full game digital download purchases and additional downloadable content.
    • Premium Console: Console games that earn revenue from purely digital products such as full game digital download purchases and additional downloadable content.
    • Pay-to-play (P2P) PC: Massively Multiplayer Online games that earn revenue from subscriptions, expansion packs and microtransaction-based virtual items and services. A subscription fee or premium account status is required from all users prior to access.
      • Pay-to-play hybrid game: A game where subscriptions provide access to substantial gameplay content (e.g., areas in the game world, expansions packs and player abilities). This also applies to all games that originally required subscriptions but later added the option to play without one.
    • Mobile: Games played on smart mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets that are strictly not played on a social networking platform. These games are purchased and/or downloaded through an app store and earn digital revenue from one-off app purchases and in-game purchases.
    • Social: Online, browser-based games played on a social networking platform. These games are mostly free-to-play and earn digital revenue from one-off app purchases and in-game purchases across PC and mobile devices logged into a social network.
    • XR: Virtual, augmented and mixed reality (VR, AR and MR). Virtual reality completely replaces a user’s view with a virtual environment, and augmented and mixed reality mix virtual imagery with the real world. Our revenue figures encompass hardware and software. Hardware revenue includes consumer and enterprise purchases of XR headsets and accessories. Software revenue reflects consumer spending on XR services and software including mobile AR apps.
    • GVC: Gaming video content includes any video content featuring a video game title or event published on media sharing websites such as YouTube, Twitch, etc. This includes game trailers, game reviews, live-stream gameplay, esports events, etc. These videos include live-streams as well as VODs (videos-on-demand).
    • Esports: Gaming video content that only showcases professional or high-level amateur gaming competitions.
  • Tablet: Portable devices that combine the capabilities of a smartphone and a laptop while being larger than the former but smaller than the latter. Support third party application integration. E.g., iPad, Samsung Galaxy Tab, Microsoft Surface, Kindle Fire.
  • Title: A unique video game that is either published, announced or is in development for a particular platform.
  • Virtual Goods: In-game items or game-related services, such as a virtual currency or temporary subscriptions that enable or enhance game play.
  • Whales: Top spending users who typically generate the bulk of revenue. Usually defined by a percentage (e.g., top 10% of spenders) or an amount (e.g., gamers with lifetime values over $1,000).
  • XR: A catch-all term for the following segments:
    • Mixed/Augmented Reality: Headsets that allow the user to view virtual images overlayed or mixed with the real world. Examples: Magic Leap, Microsoft HoloLens.
    • Mobile Augmented Reality: Experiences that overlay or mix simulated images with the real world as seen through a smartphone camera. Examples: Pokémon GO, Snapchat Lenses.
    • Virtual Reality: Headsets that completely replace a user’s view with a simulated virtual environment. Examples: Oculus Go, HTC VIVE, PlayStation VR.
  • XR Platforms: Similar to above definition of a platform, VR platforms are unique to the ecosystems within the VR segments and are a combination of hardware (console, mobile, PC) and software for AR, MR or VR:
    • Console VR: VR headsets that require a connection to an external video game console. Example: PlayStation VR.
    • Light mobile VR: Low-cost headsets that require users to slide their smartphone inside. Light mobile headsets do not interact with a smartphone’s operating system, so users have to manually launch a VR-enabled app to use VR. Example: Google Cardboard.
    • Premium mobile VR: Headsets that require users to slide their smartphone inside. Premium mobile headsets interact with a smartphone’s operating system, so phones “know” when they are in a headset. Examples: Samsung Gear VR, Google Daydream View.
    • PC VR: VR headsets that require a connection to an external PC. Examples: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift.
    • Purpose-Built Location-Based Experiences (LBE): Custom-built hardware that users can only experience at a specific physical location. Examples: The Void, Spaces VR Experiences.
    • Standalone VR: Headsets where all visuals and processing are handled by the headset itself or on a purpose-built pocket computer. Examples: Oculus Go, Oculus Quest, HTC Vive Focus.
    • 360 Video Cameras and Capture Gear: Specialized cameras that capture videos 360 degree or omnidirectional viewing capabilities using a VR headset or traditional screen. Examples: Ricoh Theta, Nokia OZO.
  • Consumer XR Software Segments
    • Education: Software primarily used for education (not including software used in academic institutions). Examples: Star Guide AR, Lecture VR.
    • Location-Based Entertainment (LBE) and Arcades: XR experiences that users can only experience at a specific physical location. Examples: Theme parks, arcades.
    • Games: Experiences with elements of traditional gameplay such as puzzle solving, competition, combat and clearly defined objectives. Examples: Beat Saber, Job Simulator, Raw Data.
    • Healthcare/Medicine: Medical treatments involving VR/AR/MR. Examples: PTSD, phantom limb treatments.
    • Interactive Media: Applications where users actively participate or explore instead of just watching. Examples: Google Earth VR, Tilt Brush.
    • Social Media: Social apps and virtual hangout spaces. Examples: Altspace VR, VRChat.
    • Video/Entertainment Media: Immersive or 360 degree media that is passively viewed using a headset. Examples: Videos on distribution platforms like Jaunt, Within, or Littlstar; live-streaming videos on applications like NextVR; VR films such as Allumette or Invasion!
    • Wellness: Consumer health, fitness and diet applications. Examples: Guided Meditation VR, VirZoom.
  • Enterprise XR Segments
    • Supply-Side Companies: Companies that “supply” XR software/services to other firms. This includes companies that do not focus solely on XR but does not include companies that only use XR internally.
    • Demand-side Companies: Companies that use XR internally for enterprise purposes. These companies have internal teams to build their own XR solutions in-house or outsource the work to supply companies.


SURVEY GLOSSARY

  • Respondent : Individuals from whom data and associated information are collected.
  • Audience: All people of a particular group (e.g., all gamers, all VR users) that survey respondents are meant to represent.
  • Completes (N): The total number of respondents in a survey.
  • Survey Platform: Software that allows users to program surveys and collect data from respondents.
  • Panel Provider: A company that provides a specified sample from a population to participate in a market research study.
  • Qualifiers: The conditions that a respondent has to meet in order to be eligible to participate in the survey. Survey completes are recorded from qualified respondents.
  • Incidence Rate: The probability of finding a person in a population who is eligible to participate in the survey, calculated as the number of people who qualified for a survey divided by the number of people who started the survey. Targeting niche populations yields lower incidence rates than targeting broad ones.
  • Cost per Incidence (CPI): The cost of a completed survey. Targeting niche populations costs more than targeting broad ones.
  • Length of Interview (LOI): The time needed for a respondent to complete a survey.
  • Translation: The conversion of text from one language to another.
  • Localization: The adaptation of content to better match the context of a specific market. Survey localization updates the text of a survey so that the message is better understood by respondents in a target market (e.g., in China, Douyu is a more appropriate example of a gaming video platform than Twitch).
  • Raw Survey Data: Unprocessed CSV data that contains one row per respondent with each column corresponding to a data point from the survey.
  • Clean Survey Data: Tabulated data in which individual responses are aggregated for each question in the survey. Each question has its own table that shows the number of occurrences of each response category of the question.


GEOGRAPHIES

*These regions are provided where applicable. Regions that do not reach a certain threshold of monthly active users are not tracked as sample sizes are too small to generate effective metrics. Ex. Nexon’s Maplestory and Dungeon Fighter Online do not have dedicated servers in many of these regions. Players generally log on to Chinese/European/North American servers and pay in the respective currencies. Because of this these users are counted as part of the regions where game servers are located.

  • Africa: Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mayotte, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Republic of the Congo, Reunion, Rwanda, Saint Helena Ascension and Tristan da Cunha, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, The Gambia, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe.
  • Asia: Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Burma, Cambodia, China, East Timor, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, North Korea, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Vietnam and all other Asian regions where available.
  • Europe: Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Vatican City.
    • EU5: France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and United Kingdom.
    • Eastern Europe: Belarus, Czech Republic, Poland, Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine.
    • Western Europe: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom.
  • Latin America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Suriname, Uruguay and Venezuela.
  • Middle East: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.
  • North America: Canada and the United States.
  • Oceania: Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu.


ADVANCED FILTERS

  • Branded IP: Any title that is based on intellectual property (IP) known primarily from media outside of video games. Examples: Star Wars: Battlefront, Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor, South Park: The Stick of Truth.
  • Console Brand Exclusive: Titles that are made available on only one console brand, such as Playstation, Xbox or Nintendo. Examples: Gears of War on Xbox consoles, Zelda on Nintendo consoles.
  • Existing IP: Titles that borrow from existing intellectual property (IP) in game franchises. This includes sequels, prequels and spin-offs. Examples: FIFA 17, Grand Theft Auto V, Hearthstone, Call of Duty Black Ops 3.
  • First-Tier Game: Any title that surpasses 3 million MAU during its lifespan on console or 1 million MAU on PC, or is part of a franchise with titles that have reached that benchmark. Examples: Call of Duty, GTA V, Starcraft.
  • Free-to-Play Console: Titles for consoles that do not require an up-front purchase. The base game is free for anyone with a console, but it may have certain game features or areas locked behind pay walls. Examples: Smite, Paragon.
  • Multiplayer-Driven Games: Titles where MAU predominately play in multiplayer game modes. (Qualitative Check)
  • New IP: Titles with original intellectual property (IP) that does not borrow from any kind of existing branding within or outside of video games. Examples: Destiny, League of Legends, Red Dead Redemption, Minecraft.
  • Open World: Titles in which players can roam freely throughout a virtual persistent world and have the option not to follow a linear path. The free-roaming area must be larger than the typical levels found in linear games, and they must allow dynamic interactions with a variety of objects. Examples include: Minecraft, Grand Theft Auto V, Red Dead Redemption, World of Warcraft.
  • Review Tier: A proprietary aggregation of critic review scores, similar to Metacritic. Tier A = any title with an average score of 90 or higher; Tier B = average score of 80-89; Tier C = average score of 70-79; Tier D = average score of 60-69; Tier F = average score below 60.
  • Second-Tier Game: Any title that has never reached 3 million MAU on console or 1 million MAU on PC, and is not part of a franchise with titles that have reached that benchmark. Examples: Mafia III, Elite Dangerous.
  • Single-Player Games: Titles where MAU predominately play linear, narrative-based gameplay that does not require other players. (Qualitative Check)
  • Sales Tiers: Classifications based on the amount of total digital revenue generated by a title in the latest full calendar year.
  • East vs West: When a title has different publishers in Asian and Western markets, we may divide the title into separate “East” and “West” entries, with “East” representing estimates pertaining to countries in Asia, and “West” containing all other regions.
  • Production Quality: Qualitative classifications taking into account the specific developer and publisher involved, estimated production cost, production duration, and eventual success of the game after launch.

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