Latest SuperData report focuses on the attitudes and habits of preteen gamers

SuperData, a Nielsen company, today released an in-depth study on preteen gamers ages 7-12 years old. Download the market brief here.

 

Preteens are the latest generation of video gamers with more access to games than any other age group before them. Overall, the 7-9 year-olds are more likely to play on mobile devices like tablets and smartphones, while the 10-12 year-olds are more likely to play on consoles. When parents were asked about their gaming habits, the majority (65%) said they played video games with their kids. However, children tend to grow out of playing with their parents as they begin playing more complex games.

 

 

What games are played the most?

The three most popular titles among preteens are Roblox (33%), Fortnite (26%) and Minecraft (24%) double as virtual hangouts with gameplay that allows for laid-back multiplayer sessions. In addition, these popular titles allow users to create their own “worlds” and game scenarios that encourage kids to unleash their own creativity and share it with friends.

The study found that parents generally view video games positively with 9 in 10 believing games can be “educational” and 4 in 5 approving of games that inspire creativity. Parents rarely set strict hourly limits on gaming like they may have done in the past. The more common practice with preteens today is to set flexible guidelines such as allowing children to play as long as they finish their homework and take occasional breaks.

 

 

In a few years, the preteen gamers of today will turn into a significant part of the larger gaming audience, and their preferences now will impact the games market for years to come. The “Preteen Gamers” report will help game publishers as well as brand marketers understand how this group of preteens engage with and consume content today enabling them to more effectively market to this hard-to-reach audience.

 

Download the market brief

 

About the Preteen Gamer Study

SuperData surveyed 1,000 parents in the U.S. and conducted in-person focus groups with a subset of preteen gamers broken into two groups: 7-9 year-olds and 10-12 year-olds. The full study focuses on eight themes including game migration and cross-play patterns, content engagement and purchase behaviors, title discovery and recommendations, parental sentiment and more. Contact us to purchase the full report.